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OPINIONS




"To sin by silence when they should protest makes cowards of men.”

                                           
President Abraham Lincoln


I’m making a couple of assumptions here. I have a public notice in hand that was run by Shasta County’s Larry Lees in the Modoc County Record in Alturas January 21.

Since it is strictly a Shasta County legal notice I’m going to assume it was also run in one of the three legally adjudicated newspapers in Shasta County, but I have no proof of that.

When I called County Executive Officer Larry Lees, about it he didn’t mention running it in Shasta County, but I didn’t specifically ask him either.

He said he was going to check on why it ran in the Record, but assumed that since it was a Shasta County Housing Authority notice, it was because Shasta County also handled the Siskiyou and Modoc County’s Housing Authorities for them.

The major problem as I see it is that it was advertising a public hearing to be held March 22 in Redding. If anyone wanted to view the proposed annual Plan they had to call a specific lady at a Redding phone number to make an appointment to view the document in her office by calling 225-5160 in Redding and asking for Christy Coleman. The review is preparatory to making input at a hearing before the Annual Plan for the Shasta County Housing Authority is adopted.

I have a couple of problems with that notice.

In the first place it doesn’t sound like it has anything to do with Siskiyou or Modoc Counties and if it does, representatives of those counties certainly aren’t doing their citizens any favors making them call and travel to Redding and then make any input in Redding.

If it is what it appears, a notice to Shasta County residents about a Shasta County Housing Authority hearing which it pruports to be, then what in the hell is it doing in the Modoc County Record and which Shasta County paper was it published in?

We are definitely experiencing winter. It seems a little odd since the last few years have been so dry. I had to laugh the other day when my husband said he hopes our cows don’t turn into water buffaloes! It has been wet; hopefully it will make a dent in our water issues in the state. I can’t wait to see what Mr. Groundhog has to say.

I hope you all had a chance to get out to the Chocolate Festival. Unfortunately my feet did not allow for that. It is always such a great event and the ladies at the healthcare foundation and the amazing volunteers do a great job putting it together. Thank you! This event has always provided funding for much needed equipment at Mayers and it involves CHOCOLATE!

One thing about being home for the last couple of weeks is being out of touch. I have no idea what is going on in town except for what I read on Facebook! I have spent way too much time on Facebook; but I have seen that our wrestlers have been doing well, parents have been traveling snowy roads to ball games and it looked like Fall River High School’s Winter Ball was a lot of fun. I just can’t believe the kids that are now in high school; weren’t they just in preschool?

I want to personally invite you all to participate in or donate to the MS Walk in Reno on April 30th. I am expecting to be fully recovered and able to join my friend Elizabeth Reynolds and walk for TEAM ELIZABETH. If you need more information see the Walk MS Reno/ Sparks website.

Any picks for the Super Bowl this weekend? I am not decided yet. I am looking forward to the commercials. I just hope it is a good game. There’s nothing worse that a Super Bowl blowout.

Wishing you all a great week and looking forward to getting back to work and catching up on what is going on in the community!

Thank You
Dear Intermountain Community: On behalf of the Fall River Valley Community Choir, I’d like to thank those of you who attended our December Christmas cantata. We were blessed to have such a crowd, and it brought us great joy to sing for you! Your support validates every minute spent in rehearsal. We’d like to extend special thanks to those who offered free-will donations at the concert. We collected $272, and half of this will be used to purchase music for future endeavors. The rest will be split evenly and used to support the Children’s Community Choir and the local Food Pantry.

We also thank all those who helped make the cantata such a wonderful success.

If you are interested in singing with us, our next adventure will be a foray into the music of Broadway. Rehearsals begin this week, and are on Thursdays from 6:30-8:00 p.m.

Sincerely, Alison Maki

Editorial
Ron usually gets to see the colorful, awesome Indian Dances, so it really tickled me when Jack Potter Jr. called and asked me if I could cover the Indian Heritage assembly the Rancheria was putting on at Fall River Elementary Friday.

The Thundering Moccasins were awesome and they held the cafeteria filled with young students and staff spellbound.

But it was a lot more than just the dancers. I’ve always considered myself fairly well versed in the day to day household items of the various tribes. But I learned how much more I had to learn.

As an example I’ve always seen depictions of Indian women grinding various nuts and seeds with a mortar and pestal. While I’m a fair cook, It isn’t my primary duty so I take it at face value.

Just two of the things I learned:
I was surprised to learn that, yes, they used the mortar and pestal, but they had a “blender setup of their own. It was a beautifully woven conical basket without a bottom.

They’d put it on the mortar, put the pestal inside and pour the acorns or whatever in the basket. They ground them just like we “modern” folk do with carrots and a motorized steel blade in the bottom of a glass bowl.

There’s a lot more. I learned to make arrowheads years ago, but what it taught me was respect for the arrowhead. Did you know that it is the arrow that is more valuable? The obsidian breaks and can be thrown away. The arrow shaft can be reused.

Editorial
I researched, interviewed, checked my facts, and bent over backwards in an effort to be fair in writing the article on Los Colinas Mobile Home Park’s pending rent hike last week.

I did send them a pdf copy of the issue with the stories and editorial in it.

It was no surprise that Sherrie Fuqua, property manager for Partners Real Estate handling Los Colinas didn’t like it.

However I was surprised to receive an e-mail from a tenant who wrote:

I am a resident of this park. I read your article. One paragraph was very interesting. If I may quote; “To help alleviate this problem, management will be instituting a rental subsidy assistance program to help those of you truly in need.” The paragraph goes on to list some perimeters. So I called the management office in Stockton, (209) 932-8747. The receptionist could not connect me with Sherrie Fuqua. However she told me: 1) they were unaware of the article, 2) unaware and to her knowledge never had or planned on implementing a rental subsidy program, and 3) never spoke to anyone at the newspaper. So, my question for you is, where did you get your information? Did you check your facts before publishing? We were hopeful when we read this. Now what?

Well, it so happens that I not only checked my facts and asked Ms. Fuqua questions and received answers, but I kept a copy of my correspondence.

Ms Fuqua responded to the e-mail I sent after receiving the tenant’s letter by saying in part... “Also I did not give you permission to send the letter to anyone as I had let you know it was an unfinished copy and I was trying to adhere to your demand of getting everything back to you on your timeline.”

I was sure she had given me that letter to use as I saw fit (after all I am a reporter, was doing a story on the subject in question and she knew it). So I went back and checked our correspondence.

On 3/8 16 at 3:41 p.m. I received one which read in part... “Just waiting on the final OK from my Boss to send you what I have. I will be in tomorrow and will send it prior to your 5:00 1/9/2016 turn around. Enjoy your Friday!

“Take Care,

“Sherrie Fuqua”

Ms. Fuqua was able to get the information I requested by 5:22 p.m. 3/8/16 and forwarded it to me. Most of the information was for background and not direct quotes and I honored her request as I understood it.

In the second line of that letter, however, she writes... “Attached is a letter written last week to the residents and scheduled to be mailed out early next week. You can consider the letter “on the record.” Some items are in draft form so there may be some further tweaks prior to mailing.”

The letter was on the record and only some “tweaks” were needed. Most people giving out material on the record would not be surprised if the reporter used it.

In her latest response to my correspondence she did say... “She does have a point about checking facts though, I have a running tab of about 5 things you posted that were false, maybe have your “editor” check better with the next article.”

Since I am not a perfect individual I am always more than willing to admit my errors and after the proper review and verification, correct them.

I haven’t received the list to date

Editorial

Prices go up every day.

We are spending a lot more in the grocery store, for food, and just about everything else than we did a year ago.

The difference is that if we don’t like it we can turn around and walk out of the store.

When you purchase a mobile home either already in a park or you have it placed in a park, you pay rent on the space.

While none of us like the rising cost of living and increased prices in most instances, we expect them as a part of life and live with them.

Tenants in mobile home parks are in a tough situation. Once the home they own is put on the space they rent, it becomes darn near impossible to move it. Thus they can’t just turn around and walk out if they don’t like the price of the rent.

Counties, cities and other jurisdictions have recognized this and because some park owners have demanded excessive space rents, have put rent controls into effect.

It is counter productive for business people to take a loss on their property. But it is also incumbent on them to do their homework when they purchase property.

It is simply not right for a buyer to come in and buy something they feel needs extensive repairs and then raise the costs accordingly.

The tenants at Las Colinas weren’t consulted about the purchase or if they were willing to pay more. They were, as I understand it reasonably happy with the arrangement they had with the old owners.

I would strongly suggest to the tenants that they get involved in the Golden State Manufactured Home League, lobby the county supervisors - no I’d hound them if necessary for rent control.
A gripe about New Years Eve and Day... I hate to rain on some people’s good times, but they need to grow up and consider those that their antics affect.

As an example, I have a little dog. My dog was a perfectly normal happy dog until last winter’s wind storm snapped two large pines off in our yard and destroyed our deck.

Like a lot of humans, she now panics when anything reminds her of the event.

Well someone on Second Street in Johnson Park, a couple of blocks from where we live, decided to set off professional sized fireworks - not just once, but twice, once on both New Years Eve and on New Years Day evening.

My dog was absolutely terrified and it took an hour to settle her down.

By the looks of the Sheriff’s log, I wasn’t the only person that was unhappy or that it disturbed.

In the first place, most of us go home to relax, especially in the evening. We don’t really appreciate rifle, shotgun, or semi auto fire - all of which the idiots shoot off fairly regularly.

In the second place, no one should have to put up with someone’s desire to set something off that falls someplace between automatic weapon fire and dynamite.

Grow up and be considerate of others!
Editorial
The Intermountain Area lost a great man December 21, when Lawrence Agee died.

He was one of the first men I met when we came to the Valley in 1976 to start Caldwell’s Corner in Burney. We had a rather old car with lots of miles which wouldn’t start one morning. Not knowing my neighbors and living at the Dabill Complex outside of McArthur, I looked in the yellow pages and called the closest business I knew could give me a jump. Lawrence rolled out, gave me a jump and bracing myself for Bay Area prices, I asked him how much I owed him.

He looked at me and seeing the look of pending panic said “nothing, don’t worry about it.”

Several years later, I really needed his service again. It was a cold, wet, morning with snow melting in the darkness along the muddy side of the dirt road at the curve just before the first house in the Indian Mission complex. I’d delivered a paper and backed up too far trying to avoid the soft soil obviously in front of the car. It was around four in the morning. Having no choice I gritted my teeth, and got Lawrence out of bed. Twenty minutes later he pulls up, kneels in the mud, hooks up the cable and pulls me back onto the dirt roadway. I tried to pay him. Again, he declined. I was mighty grateful but wondering how he got enough money to feed him and Eleanor.

I live a little too far away in Burney to cover all the McArthur and Fall River accident calls, but I can’t remember a one of those I did photograph that Lawrence wasn’t there. In fact I can’t remember a whole lot of anything going on in the Valley that Lawrence wasn’t there someplace.

I’m not the only one. The stories about his helping friends, strangers and travelers are legend.

I also don’t know of too many people who have an unkind word to say about him.

His death leaves a hole in the fabric of what makes the Intermountain area such a wonderful place to live and I as well as many others will truly miss him.

God Bless you Lawrence.

Editorial

 The Fall River Valley Community Services District rate study is in and to no one’s surprise who has been involved with or watched the district for any amount of time, the proposed rates are high.

The board just got the study and I doubt that they’ve had time to study it in any detail and won’t, I’m sure make any decisions for some time.

That board is made up of five diverse individuals, all of whom are reasonable and believe in being transparent.

In the long term they have two options.

They can either adopt an increase schedule that will assure a viable district or they can adopt a much more popular increase and one of these days people will wake up and won’t have water come out of their faucet or shower.

Inflation has eaten us all alive. Our spending power is far less than what it was in years past. Almost everyone else has already jumped on the bandwagon, raising rates, lessening services, and forcing the consumer to tighten the belt. The CSD hasn’t and it shows.

It is headquartered in a building with a lot of problems. It has been replacing sections of pipe that are split and terribly rusted. It is paying through the nose for electricity and (by the way) couldn’t get grants or low interest loans in most cases until they got this water study, which in turn, will mean they’ll have to do something about it.

I suggest folks come to the district meetings, ask intelligent questions, and listen to the answers. The directors are charged with doing what’s right for the district. They aren’t out to screw anyone. Try to be a part of the solution, not a part of the problem.

Person on the Street
What’s your New Year Resolution?

“My resolution is not
to have a resolution.”

Taunya Ross
Burney



To be happy and to
visit Fall River more!

The Kramers
Severance, Colorado


“I didn’t make a New
Year Resolution. There
are 365 other days in
2016 to change my life!”

Dave Shoup
Fall River Mills

If you have a topic suggestion call us at 336-6262

Editorial
I don’t know about you but I can’t be negative on a full stomach.

Thanksgiving was wonderful and so was the rest of the week for that matter.

The Burney Lions Club served 12 turkeys to 250 hungry folks, received enough donations to cover their expenses and over 50 of the meals went to shut-ins. Thanks to the Lions!

Then there was Firefighter Trevor Babajan! It takes a special kind of person to take the time and effort to try to save someone’s pet and he’s that kind of person!

The Burney Chamber of Commerce, Burney Lions, Burney-Fall River Soroptimists, Burney- Fall River Rotary, Burney Veterans’ Honor Guard, Pastor Henry Winkelman and family, Santa Claus, Burney Fire and the Burney Basin Days Royalty not to mention all those who helped string the Christmas lights on the Christmas Tree Lane trees.

It was mighty cold but a mighty good time. You all showed the world what Burney Community Spirit is all about.

I didn’t keep up with the weather - well I can’t say that... I did. Last week was Brr cold with the last three days being inhumane.

I did glance at the temperature gauge in the truck a few times and, as I remember it we were in the mid to low teens.

Today it was 15 all the way from Johnson Park to the Pit One Grade. I know Calvin Beebe would argue my figures.

The thermometer on his porch read nine degrees a couple of nights ago. It is Block F time which means sports fans get to sit in bleachers in a warm gym and enjoy the excitement.

You all have a great week and I’ll try to find something to raise cane about by next week.

 Editorial
I’m on a mosquito abatement board and have been for somewhere around 35 years, so I’m fairly passionate about making sure those folks in my district get the best control and fewest mosquitoes possible.

I’m also a reporter and nothing makes me madder than to be stonewalled or kept from getting facts that the general public really needs to know because it is politically correct.

When West Nile Virus came on the scene, Mike Churney, then manager of the Burney District explained just how devastating the virus can be. Since I know Mike and know he doesn’t exaggerate or lie, I took it to heart.


Then the Shasta County Health Department became involved in hording statistics.

In the following years they would, on occasion tell us there had been a case in Shasta County.

That really fed the flames because other counties would routinely say what city or area it was in when they had a case.

I’d tell them that the County was a big area, that I reported for a rural portion of the county and could give a damn less what happened in Redding. I needed to know if the case was in Eastern Shasta County.

Their approach was that it was too bad, they didn’t even tell the manager if it was in his district. I wasn’t going to get it either.

In the last couple of weeks there was a list of the water abusers, primarily large corporations and billionaires who don’t give a damn and who can afford to pay the fines.

Then I turn on the TV and see the news clip of a tourist bus running wild through downtown someplace in the cities. It had apparently had a malfunction and the driver tried to stop it by steering it into road barriers at a construction site.

It didn’t work because the barriers were actually plastic water containers and whoever was supposed to have maintained them hadn’t. They were supposed to be filled with tons of water but had sprung leaks.

That did make me fairly angry. Instead of using concrete barriers it had been okay for the company to use water filled barriers when people have to let their lawns die and can’t raise crops Every one of those barriers at one time filled by enough water to have kept my lawn and every other lawn in the Intermountain Area green, and had allowed it to leak out.

Then they wonder why we have so little use for our government, its officials, and its laws.

Shame on them!

Editorial
I’m on a mosquito abatement board and have been for somewhere around 35 years, so I’m fairly passionate about making sure those folks in my district get the best control and fewest mosquitoes possible.

I’m also a reporter and nothing makes me madder than to be stonewalled or kept from getting facts that the general public really needs to know because it is politically correct.

When West Nile Virus came on the scene, Mike Churney, then manager of the Burney District explained just how devastating the virus can be. Since I know Mike and know he doesn’t exaggerate or lie, I took it to heart.


Then the Shasta County Health Department became involved in hording statistics.

In the following years they would, on occasion tell us there had been a case in Shasta County.

That really fed the flames because other counties would routinely say what city or area it was in when they had a case.

I’d tell them that the County was a big area, that I reported for a rural portion of the county and could give a damn less what happened in Redding. I needed to know if the case was in Eastern Shasta County.

Their approach was that it was too bad, they didn’t even tell the manager if it was in his district. I wasn’t going to get it either.

Finally, when I didn’t bother to report on it, they began to tell us if it was in the city, I-5 area, western or eastern area.

I heard on the grapevine that we had a case in the Fall River Valley. That the man, who happened to be a customer, had been admitted to the hospital and finally transferred to Redding which fell in a plausible scenario. I checked with sources at Mayers and they claimed not to have heard anything.

I checked with Rick Dougherty, now manager of my district and he hadn’t heard anything.

Then I went to a meeting Wednesday and Dougherty told me he had heard from sources in the Redding area that indeed we had a case in Fall River Mills.

I kinda came unglued.

So Friday I called Dr. Deckert who heads the Health Department and true to most county departments on Friday got answering machines.

So I told the answering machine who I was, what I wanted and what I thought of them and the situation.

Then, finally desperate enough to do my job the right way, called the victim of the virus.

He had no problem with me using his name. Told me everything I needed to know. That was when I found out he had contracted the virus in Magalia and had been hospitalized at Enlow in Chico.

Needless to say I then called Deckert’s office back and actually reached a real person, a pleasant young woman who thankfully hadn’t heard my message, but promised to convey my apologies to Deckert.

However, HIPPA be damned, the Shasta County Health Department is hiding behind it, saying they might violate a patient’s privacy by saying a victim is male and lives in the Intermountain Area. That is silly and the problem is that if people know that there is a case in the immediate area they will undoubtedly take precautions they might not otherwise take. It is absolutely ludicrous that they won’t tell the managers so extra attention can be brought to bear on an area the manager wasn’t aware of.

Person on the Street
How long should it take to build a bridge?

“Due to the humanity side of the issue we need federal attention brought to it some how due to the potential harm due to the lack of (emergency) response time.”
Javier Chico
Day Road


“I watched them build the Benicia Martinez Bridge over the San Francisco Bay in three years. So the Pit River should take a private contractor four months.”
Toby Corder
Pittville

“No more than a year! However, when you are dealing with the goverment and state it will take a lot longer”
Donna Hamilton
McArthur


If you have a topic suggestion call us at 336-6262

Thank You
Thank you to all of you who offered thoughts and prayers to all of us at the passing of Lois Brown.

We want to thank the staff or all of the patience and thoughtful care they gave her during her stay at Mayers.

Thank you, Dr. Dahle, for everything you did for Lois and her family.

We want to say thank you to the Hat Creek Fire Department for making the reception so nice.

It makes us appreciate living in a small community and knowing there are so many caring people offering support of a loved one and their families.
Dave & Jim Brown and extended families
Judie Carpenter and extended family

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